The Company

In 1955, Konstantinos Toskoudis, the founder of Suntos SA, entered into the raisin processing, standardization and exporting business by building a privately-owned raisin factory in the city of Heraklion, Crete.

In 1981, a state-of-the-art privately-owned unit was built in the industrial area, on a plot of land of 15,000 sq.m. There, raisins are processed, standardized and packaged.

Its state-of-the-art machinery, with production capability of up to 30 tonnes/8 hrs, guarantees consistent product quality.

There is a complete production line consisting of laundry, sulphiting room, furnace, sorting screens, stemming machines, laser machines, automatic weighing systems, formulator machines and state-of-the-art electronic machines that control impurities such as metal objects, etc..

Strict continuous quality controls during production by experienced staff ensure the high quality of the final product.

Our customers throughout Europe, many of whom are large factories such as chocolate factories, bread factories, etc. have endorsed us as their partners and suppliers on account of the high quality and hygienic conditions of our factory.

Apart from the export sector, the company is also active in the domestic Greek market, with impressively increasing annual growth rates.

Raisins are now among the healthiest and most natural products, without preservatives or dyes, which should be made widely known to consumers considering its relatively cheap cost over other similar products.

Following closely the steps and the instructions of its late founder, Konstantinos Toskoudis, the raisins factory and the hotel complexes operate under the supervision of a new generation of successors of the Toskoudis family, who are working tirelessly and with a high sense of duty to grow their company.

THE FACTORY

In 1981, our company built a raisin factory in the Industrial Area of Heraklion, Crete on a private land of 15,000 sq.m. where processing, formulation and packaging of raisins takes place.

There is a complete production line consisting of laundry, sulphiting room, furnace, sorting screens, stemming machines, laser machines, automatic weighing systems, formulator machines and state-of-the-art electronic machines that control impurities such as metal objects, etc
Its state-of-the-art machinery, with production capability of up to 30 tonnes/8 hrs, guarantees consistent product quality.

Our factory is equipped with the latest packaging technology. We can package raisins in bulks of several kilograms each as well in bags of different grams each.

Strict continuous quality controls during production by experienced staff ensure the high quality of the final product.

Sultanas

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Sultanas come from the dried grapes of the Sultana variety from which they derive their name. They are seedless, golden-coloured raisins (without nucleus) and their colour is due to the white grapes. The sultanas are produced in Crete and, more specifically, across the Heraklion Prefecture.
The sultanas are divided into 4 different types based on the size of their berries. As the type number increases, so does the number of berries per 100 grams. As a result, raisins are more wispy

The sultanas Blonde are packaged and marketed by our company in a bulk pack of 10 kg on concrete boxes depending on the type of raisin and in bags of 200 grams each.

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Bag
sakoulaki_soultanina
TYPE Νο 1
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TYPE Νο 2
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TYPE Νο 22

Currants

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The black currant comes from the drying black grapes. The color of this raisin is black because of the black grapes. The black currant is mainly produced in Corinth, in the Peloponnese region.

The Corinth Currants are packaged and marketed by our company in a bulk pack of 10 kg in white boxes and in bags of 200 grams each.

μαυρη σακουλάκι


Bag
Μαύρη χύμα


Currants

The History of Raisins

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The vineyard is one of the oldest plants cultivated by man. A great deal has been said and written about the beneficial properties and the value of the grapes, wine and raisins as food, as a remedy or as a body tonic. The entire history of Crete, the Peloponnese and the wider Mediterranean region has been influenced by the vineyard culture. It is a matter of record that from all peoples in the world, the most skilled vine growers and winemakers are the Greeks and then the Romans. Areas such as mythology, painting, sculpture, poetry, customs and tradition, dietary habits, trade, medicine and even the Greek orthodox religion are all marked by the vine. Ancient Greek writers such as Herodotus, Plato and Aristotle often referred to raisins in their manuscripts, known then as “astafides” or “stafylides” or “raisins.”

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Today, two main varieties are grown: the Corinth currant which is mainly cultivated across the north and west part of the Peloponnese and the Sultana, which is mainly cultivated in Heraklion, Crete. The word “raisin” is reserved for the “currant” being a dried small Black Corinth grape with “sultana” being a golden-coloured dried grape. The sultana is of Asian origin and comes from the region of “Soultanie” in North Iran. From there, in the 12th century BC, it was introduced and cultivated in the valley of the Gediz River (the Magnesia of Asia Minor). Then, its cultivation spread to the Izmir region and to the rest of the Ionia coast. The sultanas were introduced from Smyrna in the Nafplion area in 1838, then on to the Argolis region and in 1901 in Crete.

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Previously, our ancestors got most of their nutrition from raisins and believed that it had magical properties and that it was highly beneficial for our body. After 1922, the year of the refugee reflux from Asia Minor, raisin were grown for profit. Refugees had extensive experience in the cultivation of sultanas and established large export businesses. In 1915, sultana vines in the wider region of Izmir were approximately 1,000,000 stremma, the majority of them inoculated with American varieties. In 1925, the production of sultanas in Greece reached 8,000 tonnes, whereas, the period from 1938 to 1960, it reached 30,000 tonnes. In 1983, Greece had the largest raisin production: around 102,000 tonnes. Nowadays, the production is around 8,000 tonnes.

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Raisins, like other dried fruits (apricots, figs, prunes) are concentrated sources of energy, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. 100 g of raisins provide 249 calories, several times more fibre than fresh grapes, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants like polyphenols. The other components are less present compared to fresh grapes (e.g. vitamin C, folic acid, carotenoids, lutein and xanthines)

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Furthermore, there are indications that resveratrol can reduce the risk of stroke by interfering with molecular mechanisms in blood vessels. This is done, firstly by reducing the sensitivity of the blood vessels to damage through reduced activity of angiotensin (systemic hormone causes contraction of the blood vessels which can increase blood pressure), and secondly, by increased production of the vasodilator nitric oxide substance (a beneficial compound which causes relaxation of blood vessels). All grapes, and especially those derived from red / purple grapes, contain anthocyanins, another class of polyphenolic antioxidants. It has been found that anthocyanins have anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anticancer action

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100g of raisins provide 3.7 g or 10% of the daily recommended levels of dietary fibres. The analysis of the composition of raisin dietary fibres (Camire, Dougherty, 2003) showed that it contained mainly pectins and polysaccharides of glucose and mannose residues. Studies have shown that the inclusion of foods with fibre in our diet helps to maintain healthy body weight, helps reduce blood cholesterol levels, and even contributes to the proper functioning of the colon and the reduction of constipation episodes (reducing gastrointestinal transit). There have been reports of positive effects in the prevention of certain cancers, especially intestine and breast cancer. Moreover, raisins contain flavonoid compounds such as tartaric acid, tannins, catechins, etc.

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It should be stressed that raisins can prove useful in the fight against carries, too. Although their texture is “sticky”, they contain microorganisms, which compensate for the negative effects of bacteria that cause damage to dental plaque. Raisins are concentrated sources of metals such as calcium, iron, manganese, magnesium, copper, fluorine, and zinc. Copper and manganese are essential co-factors of superoxide dismutase, an antioxidant enzyme. 100g of raisins provide 23% of the RDA (Recommended Daily Intake) in iron. They also contain potassium which is useful for the heart as it helps the elimination of excess sodium, thus lowering hypertension. 100g of raisins provide 749 mg of potassium.

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Raisins contain borium (at a concentration of 2.2 mg / 100 g), an element essential for growth, which can also prevent osteoporosis and arthritis. They also contain B complex vitamins such as thiamine, pyridoxine, riboflavin, folic and pantothenic acid. Raisins do not contain much vitamin C, but this is true for almost all dried fruits.

Contact us

industrial Area Heraklion Square 13 Street I Heraklion - Crete - Greece, Zip. 71110

+30 2810 380833-4
fax +30 2810 380835

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